Joint Efforts of IGGP and the CDC to Unlock the Infrastructure Development in North Africa through Public-Private Partnerships

Infrastructure Development Africa

THE IGGP (INTERNATIONAL GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS) AND THE CDC (DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AND COORDINATION) ARE COLLABORATING TO FACILITATE INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT IN NORTH AFRICA. THEY ARE FOCUSING ON THE POTENTIAL OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS (PPPS) TO UNLOCK SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE GROWTH IN THE REGION.


Developing countries are facing significant challenges in their macroeconomic environment, with high levels of public debt hampering their ability to finance infrastructure projects through traditional means. These challenges have been further exacerbated by the consequences of Covid-19, climate change, and high trade deficits. As a result, there is an urgent need to explore alternative financing methods for sustainable and inclusive infrastructure development.

Advertisements

One potential solution is the mobilization of private sector resources and capital through public-private partnerships (PPPs). However, in North Africa, despite the presence of legal frameworks and dedicated bodies for PPPs in countries like Tunisia, Morocco, Egypt, and Mauritania, and upcoming ones in Libya and Algeria, the progress in developing and operating bankable PPP infrastructure projects has been slow, despite a strong demand for such projects.

The low success rate of PPP Infrastructure Development in North Africa highlights the challenges faced by policymakers and other stakeholders in the infrastructure ecosystem, including financial institutions, engineering firms, and transaction advisory firms. To address these challenges, the Bank, in collaboration with the IGGP and the CDC of Tunisia, is proposing to organize a seminar with the following objectives:

Advertisements
Advertisements
  • Identify the barriers that hinder the successful development and completion of PPP infrastructure projects in the North African region.
  • Disseminate knowledge and best practices for conducting PPP projects, covering all stages from identification and preparation to structuring, procurement, implementation, and operation and maintenance.
  • Establish an association of national bodies responsible for PPPs in North Africa.

Participation in the seminar will be by invitation only, and virtual attendance will be available for selected participants. The seminar will bring together decision-makers from six North African Public-Private Partnership Units, as well as project sponsors, financial institutions, government officials, donors, and other relevant stakeholders. The event will be conducted in French, English, and Arabic, with translation services provided to ensure effective communication among participants.

 

Related News


Nigeria’s Travel and Tourism Industry Expected to Generate $2.95 Billion in Revenue by 2023(Opens in a new browser tab)

Zimbabwe’s Tourism Sector Revives with Increased Investor Interest and Infrastructure Upgrades(Opens in a new browser tab)

Egypt Introduces New Visa Measures to Boost Tourism(Opens in a new browser tab)

Accor appoints new Senior VP role to Europe & North Africa(Opens in a new browser tab)

Egypt’s Hospitality Sector Expands with the Opening of Four New Luxury Hotels in Cairo(Opens in a new browser tab)

Advertisements